Reformed Theology Are Seraphim snakes? -- Hebrew/OT interpretation help  Calvinism

Are Seraphim snakes? — Hebrew/OT interpretation help

Reformed Theology Are Seraphim snakes? -- Hebrew/OT interpretation help  Calvinism
Are Seraphim snakes? — Hebrew/OT interpretation help

I read this article the other day; sorry for the google translation, original is in French.

His basic argument is that the Hebrew word seraph can mean either burning one or serpent, and it is translated contextually. Based on Egyptian examples of winged serpents in artwork and sculpture contemporaneous to Isaiah, he suggests that our image of seraphim as humans with wings (the typical angel image) is mistaken, and that they were/are in fact winged snakes guarding the throne of God.

I have never heard of anything like this before, but I found it very interesting, especially the understanding it adds to the serpent image in Genesis 3 — if Seraphim are winged, flying snakes, and Satan is a fallen angel, both the talking snake as tempter and the condemnation for snakes to go on their bellies make a lot of sense.

But I am unable to evaluate the argument myself, I don't have the Hebrew or OT contextual background. Normally I wouldn't give too much credence to something so 'out there' from common teaching, but the blog is run by people from what I understand to be a fairly reliable reformed source — the Faculté Jean-Calvin in Aix-en-Provence, France.

Any insight would be much appreciated, thank you!

I read this article the other day; sorry for the google translation, original is in French.His basic argument is that the Hebrew word seraph can mean either burning one or serpent, and it is translated contextually. Based on Egyptian examples of winged serpents in artwork and sculpture contemporaneous to Isaiah, he suggests that our image of seraphim as humans with wings (the typical angel image) is mistaken, and that they were/are in fact winged snakes guarding the throne of God.I have never heard of anything like this before, but I found it very interesting, especially the understanding it adds to the serpent image in Genesis 3 — if Seraphim are winged, flying snakes, and Satan is a fallen angel, both the talking snake as tempter and the condemnation for snakes to go on their bellies make a lot of sense.But I am unable to evaluate the argument myself, I don’t have the Hebrew or OT contextual background. Normally I wouldn’t give too much credence to something so ‘out there’ from common teaching, but the blog is run by people from what I understand to be a fairly reliable reformed source — the Faculté Jean-Calvin in Aix-en-Provence, France.Any insight would be much appreciated, thank you!
Link: Are Seraphim snakes? — Hebrew/OT interpretation help
Submitted by bradmont