Reformed Theology Could the pharisee in the parable was presuming his election?  Calvinism

Could the pharisee in the parable was presuming his election?

Reformed Theology Could the pharisee in the parable was presuming his election?  Calvinism
Could the pharisee in the parable was presuming his election?

The traditional interpretation of the parable of the pharisee and publican is that the pharisee thought that could be saved by his works, and the publican aknowledge God's grace.

But the npp aproach says that the pharisees were not believers in salvation by works, but by their convenment.

In Luke one can read:

9 And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others: 10 Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. 11 The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. 12 I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. 13 And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. 14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.

If you see, the pharisee is not saying that he had done the works by himself, but thanks God because he is not "as other man are".

Now look that passage of Spurgeon defending calvinism:

I suppose there are some persons whose minds naturally incline towards the doctrine of free-will. I can only say that mine inclines as naturally towards the doctrines of sovereign grace. Sometimes, when I see some of the worst characters in the street, I feel as if my heart must burst forth in tears of gratitude that God has never let me act as they have done! I have thought, if God had left me alone, and had not touched me by His grace, what a great sinner I should have been! I should have run to the utmost lengths of sin, dived into the very depths of evil, nor should I have stopped at any vice or folly, if God had not restrained me. I feel that I should have been a very king of sinners, if God had let me alone.

I'm not calling Sporgeon a pharisee, but I would like to know what is the difference between the pharisee thanking God and Spurgeon feeling gratitude for not being as other man in the streets.

Ps: I do not want to tease you, only be informed about the view, because I am considering the presbyterianism

The traditional interpretation of the parable of the pharisee and publican is that the pharisee thought that could be saved by his works, and the publican aknowledge God’s grace.But the npp aproach says that the pharisees were not believers in salvation by works, but by their convenment.In Luke one can read:9 And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others: 10 Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. 11 The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. 12 I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. 13 And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. 14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.If you see, the pharisee is not saying that he had done the works by himself, but thanks God because he is not “as other man are”.Now look that passage of Spurgeon defending calvinism:I suppose there are some persons whose minds naturally incline towards the doctrine of free-will. I can only say that mine inclines as naturally towards the doctrines of sovereign grace. Sometimes, when I see some of the worst characters in the street, I feel as if my heart must burst forth in tears of gratitude that God has never let me act as they have done! I have thought, if God had left me alone, and had not touched me by His grace, what a great sinner I should have been! I should have run to the utmost lengths of sin, dived into the very depths of evil, nor should I have stopped at any vice or folly, if God had not restrained me. I feel that I should have been a very king of sinners, if God had let me alone.I’m not calling Sporgeon a pharisee, but I would like to know what is the difference between the pharisee thanking God and Spurgeon feeling gratitude for not being as other man in the streets.Ps: I do not want to tease you, only be informed about the view, because I am considering the presbyterianism
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