Reformed Theology Finding a Christian home (Possible TLDR, rambling)  Calvinism

Finding a Christian home (Possible TLDR, rambling)

Reformed Theology Finding a Christian home (Possible TLDR, rambling)  Calvinism
Finding a Christian home (Possible TLDR, rambling)

I am a Christian who with an Evangelical Southern Baptist upbringing, and I may have been brought up as an Arminian (though I did not know about it until after learning about Calvinism from an SDA-run school.)

I have accepted more and more of Calvinism, but I am not sure whether or not I fit in with Reformed theology. I have been taking an agnostic stance towards denominations lately where I believe in God and that I have salvation through Jesus Christ, but aside from that, I'm not sure about anything.

For a little while, I was a Molinist, as it seems to be the middle-ground between Calvinism and Arminianism, and I saw the middle-ground as usually, if not always, being right. I started accepting Calvinism after debating Molinism with Arminians. They told me Molinism was purely a philosophical conjecture that did not start with Scripture, while Arminianism did. I agree with this, though I would also say that Calvin also started with Scripture. I think Jacob Arminius was in error, though a relatively benign one, and I think his heart was in the right place, regardless. I also think you could defend all three views from Scripture, though I now find Calvinism to be the most compelling.

Part of my struggle with finding a church to call home is that there are some groups I really like who I think are correct about a lot things, but there are usually one or two dealbreakers for me. I love Quakers, and almost joined them until I decided to give Calvinism another look, but I still have massive respect for the Quaker movement. I'm the same towards Mennonites.

Politically, I'm a moderate centrist. I'm not exactly a conservative, but I don't consider myself a liberal (except in the classical sense) or a progressive. I believe abortion is murder and wrong, but when it comes to the actual politics and legality of it, I'm reluctantly pro-choice. I also don't agree with same-sex marriages, but it's also none of my business either. Ideally, I think marriage should be privatized, and instead refer to a relationship between two consenting adults as civil unions, regardless of whether the couple are of the same or opposite sexes. However, I am content with the status quo we now have here in the U.S.

I'm undecided about baptism (whether infants can and should be baptized, or if it is only for professing believers), and I see both sides.

I'm the same with eschatology. I'm not sure about dispensationalism anymore, but I wouldn't say that there is no future left for national or ethnic Israel either, though the distinction between the Church and Israel may not be as distinct as dispies believe. I think tolerance should be extended to different eschatological views in the sense that they should all be scrutinized fairly and equally and without misrepresenting what each actually believes. I think both sides are guilty of this.

I left evangelicalism because I find it spiritually lacking in some ways. I am an ardent supporter in sola scriptura, but I still find value in the Early Church Fathers and history, but I could never cross into Rome or Constantinople, so for awhile, Anglicanism was very appealing to me. I don't consider the Apocryphal texts as Scripture, but I think they can be useful for wisdom.

Where do I belong.

I am a Christian who with an Evangelical Southern Baptist upbringing, and I may have been brought up as an Arminian (though I did not know about it until after learning about Calvinism from an SDA-run school.)I have accepted more and more of Calvinism, but I am not sure whether or not I fit in with Reformed theology. I have been taking an agnostic stance towards denominations lately where I believe in God and that I have salvation through Jesus Christ, but aside from that, I’m not sure about anything.For a little while, I was a Molinist, as it seems to be the middle-ground between Calvinism and Arminianism, and I saw the middle-ground as usually, if not always, being right. I started accepting Calvinism after debating Molinism with Arminians. They told me Molinism was purely a philosophical conjecture that did not start with Scripture, while Arminianism did. I agree with this, though I would also say that Calvin also started with Scripture. I think Jacob Arminius was in error, though a relatively benign one, and I think his heart was in the right place, regardless. I also think you could defend all three views from Scripture, though I now find Calvinism to be the most compelling.Part of my struggle with finding a church to call home is that there are some groups I really like who I think are correct about a lot things, but there are usually one or two dealbreakers for me. I love Quakers, and almost joined them until I decided to give Calvinism another look, but I still have massive respect for the Quaker movement. I’m the same towards Mennonites.Politically, I’m a moderate centrist. I’m not exactly a conservative, but I don’t consider myself a liberal (except in the classical sense) or a progressive. I believe abortion is murder and wrong, but when it comes to the actual politics and legality of it, I’m reluctantly pro-choice. I also don’t agree with same-sex marriages, but it’s also none of my business either. Ideally, I think marriage should be privatized, and instead refer to a relationship between two consenting adults as civil unions, regardless of whether the couple are of the same or opposite sexes. However, I am content with the status quo we now have here in the U.S.I’m undecided about baptism (whether infants can and should be baptized, or if it is only for professing believers), and I see both sides.I’m the same with eschatology. I’m not sure about dispensationalism anymore, but I wouldn’t say that there is no future left for national or ethnic Israel either, though the distinction between the Church and Israel may not be as distinct as dispies believe. I think tolerance should be extended to different eschatological views in the sense that they should all be scrutinized fairly and equally and without misrepresenting what each actually believes. I think both sides are guilty of this.I left evangelicalism because I find it spiritually lacking in some ways. I am an ardent supporter in sola scriptura, but I still find value in the Early Church Fathers and history, but I could never cross into Rome or Constantinople, so for awhile, Anglicanism was very appealing to me. I don’t consider the Apocryphal texts as Scripture, but I think they can be useful for wisdom.Where do I belong.
Link: Finding a Christian home (Possible TLDR, rambling)
Submitted by ShinyKatana

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