Reformed Theology I think something just clicked for me and I’d like your feedback.  Calvinism

I think something just clicked for me and I’d like your feedback.

Reformed Theology I think something just clicked for me and I’d like your feedback.  Calvinism
I think something just clicked for me and I’d like your feedback.

Okay, as some of you might remember, my first post here was a question about total depravity, wherein my main question was how Jesus bypassed inheriting a sinful nature (my assumption being that depravity was inherited in a genetic sense). Y’all were super gracious and patient with me in that discussion, and I appreciate that. As something of an update and reaching out for feedback, here’s a novel about me potentially changing my view: So recently, I’ve been listening to Theocast a lot. They’re pretty close to Nashville, which is the closest cultural/population center where I live (Undisclosed location in Northeast MS), so it feels kind of homey to me and I like their personalities and chemistry. Anyway, in the course of listening, a phrase that keeps coming up is sin as a state of being rather than just particular behaviors. I already agreed that sin was first and foremost a state of being, but something just came together that I’ve been rolling around in my head since yesterday morning. The notion of sin as state of being and as status particularly really clicked with me in tandem with the imagery of being a slave to sin, especially in John 8:34 and the language of being set free from sin in Romans 6 (a passage I love dearly and have spent a lot of time on). All of this has collided with my writing a thesis on Owen and on Romans 5:12-21, especially with the many being made sinners in Adam and the many being made righteous in Christ. Here’s my working thesis: All people are, by virtue of being humans, are born by default into Adam, the first slave to sin. In the same way that one born to a slave inherits their status as slave, so also all humans inherit the slave status of their first parent, Adam, and in the same way that the children of slaves are treated as slaves and act like slaves (I concede that children of slaves may not be treated or expected to act exactly like slaves, but you get my point), so also children who inherit this slave status act accordingly. A slave’s will is bound and affected by their being slave and this parallels with our will being bound by being slaves to sin even as children. To me, this also plays well into justification, since for all the effort a slave may exert in obtaining their freedom, they have to be declared free by a power beyond themselves and their slave owner in order to be set free (being declared free here being parallel to being declared righteous). There’s obviously a lot of nuance and expansion that could go into this, but this is where I’m at so far. I’m not naive enough to think that I’m the first person to have ever come up with this, but I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Okay, as some of you might remember, my first post here was a question about total depravity, wherein my main question was how Jesus bypassed inheriting a sinful nature (my assumption being that depravity was inherited in a genetic sense). Y’all were super gracious and patient with me in that discussion, and I appreciate that. As something of an update and reaching out for feedback, here’s a novel about me potentially changing my view: So recently, I’ve been listening to Theocast a lot. They’re pretty close to Nashville, which is the closest cultural/population center where I live (Undisclosed location in Northeast MS), so it feels kind of homey to me and I like their personalities and chemistry. Anyway, in the course of listening, a phrase that keeps coming up is sin as a state of being rather than just particular behaviors. I already agreed that sin was first and foremost a state of being, but something just came together that I’ve been rolling around in my head since yesterday morning. The notion of sin as state of being and as status particularly really clicked with me in tandem with the imagery of being a slave to sin, especially in John 8:34 and the language of being set free from sin in Romans 6 (a passage I love dearly and have spent a lot of time on). All of this has collided with my writing a thesis on Owen and on Romans 5:12-21, especially with the many being made sinners in Adam and the many being made righteous in Christ. Here’s my working thesis: All people are, by virtue of being humans, are born by default into Adam, the first slave to sin. In the same way that one born to a slave inherits their status as slave, so also all humans inherit the slave status of their first parent, Adam, and in the same way that the children of slaves are treated as slaves and act like slaves (I concede that children of slaves may not be treated or expected to act exactly like slaves, but you get my point), so also children who inherit this slave status act accordingly. A slave’s will is bound and affected by their being slave and this parallels with our will being bound by being slaves to sin even as children. To me, this also plays well into justification, since for all the effort a slave may exert in obtaining their freedom, they have to be declared free by a power beyond themselves and their slave owner in order to be set free (being declared free here being parallel to being declared righteous). There’s obviously a lot of nuance and expansion that could go into this, but this is where I’m at so far. I’m not naive enough to think that I’m the first person to have ever come up with this, but I’d love to hear your thoughts!
Link: I think something just clicked for me and I’d like your feedback.
Submitted by SamGlover1256

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