Reformed Theology I want to be reformed but...  Calvinism

I want to be reformed but…

Reformed Theology I want to be reformed but...  Calvinism
I want to be reformed but…

I just can't get past some fundamental reformed hermeneutics. I'd be more than happy to be corrected on reformed doctrine if I'm wrong about reformed positions, but a close friend of mine is reformed and we seem to always come back to disagreeing about hermeneutics.

First off, I consider myself a progressive dispensationalist. I've arrived at this stance because i fervently believe that there has to be a literal understanding of the promises of God in the OT. This is because I struggle with the idea that the church has replaced Israel. At the same time there are not two people of God. There is only one; only one bride. So when it comes to progressive dispensationalism there is an already spiritual fulfillment but a not yet literal fulfillment.

I say all that to say this, if all the promises God made to Abraham and Israel are not literally fulfilled, it is because they are spiritually fulfilled (reformed doctrine). If they are spiritually fulfilled in the church alone then we can assume that God does not have to fulfill literally any promises He made for the church. He has shown before that literal fulfillments are not His intention. I just can't go there…

Even more so than that, how do we then know any of Genesis 1-11 is literal? What if it all came to be fulfilled spiritually? Or fulfilled through some other medium we do not understand?

How do we know Jesus is literally coming back? Could it just typify some other fulfillment that is not literal? What about the day of the LORD? Peter said that as the flood was so will be the future judgement of this world. But if God doesn't have to fulfill literally…

And this is my problem. I like reformed doctrine nearly everywhere else but if Israel is replaced by the church in its entirety then I can't take God's words at face value. That's what it feels like. There of course is a spiritual reality to all of God's promises but as a progressive dispensationalist there is also a literal.

I probably haven't made it evident, but I really do admire reformed doctrine in a lot of ways, but I just keep running into this wall in my mind… Is there something I'm missing? Or am I spouting nonsense because not every reformed think the church has replaced Israel? (My friend certainly does and he calls himself reformed.)

I just can’t get past some fundamental reformed hermeneutics. I’d be more than happy to be corrected on reformed doctrine if I’m wrong about reformed positions, but a close friend of mine is reformed and we seem to always come back to disagreeing about hermeneutics.First off, I consider myself a progressive dispensationalist. I’ve arrived at this stance because i fervently believe that there has to be a literal understanding of the promises of God in the OT. This is because I struggle with the idea that the church has replaced Israel. At the same time there are not two people of God. There is only one; only one bride. So when it comes to progressive dispensationalism there is an already spiritual fulfillment but a not yet literal fulfillment.I say all that to say this, if all the promises God made to Abraham and Israel are not literally fulfilled, it is because they are spiritually fulfilled (reformed doctrine). If they are spiritually fulfilled in the church alone then we can assume that God does not have to fulfill literally any promises He made for the church. He has shown before that literal fulfillments are not His intention. I just can’t go there…Even more so than that, how do we then know any of Genesis 1-11 is literal? What if it all came to be fulfilled spiritually? Or fulfilled through some other medium we do not understand?How do we know Jesus is literally coming back? Could it just typify some other fulfillment that is not literal? What about the day of the LORD? Peter said that as the flood was so will be the future judgement of this world. But if God doesn’t have to fulfill literally…And this is my problem. I like reformed doctrine nearly everywhere else but if Israel is replaced by the church in its entirety then I can’t take God’s words at face value. That’s what it feels like. There of course is a spiritual reality to all of God’s promises but as a progressive dispensationalist there is also a literal.I probably haven’t made it evident, but I really do admire reformed doctrine in a lot of ways, but I just keep running into this wall in my mind… Is there something I’m missing? Or am I spouting nonsense because not every reformed think the church has replaced Israel? (My friend certainly does and he calls himself reformed.)
Link: I want to be reformed but…
Submitted by FFpain

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