Reformed Theology Is there a serious difference between classical Thomism and moderate Calvinism?  Calvinism

Is there a serious difference between classical Thomism and moderate Calvinism?

Reformed Theology Is there a serious difference between classical Thomism and moderate Calvinism?  Calvinism
Is there a serious difference between classical Thomism and moderate Calvinism?

A Traditional Catholic friend sent me this description of the classical Thomist view of Grace/Predestination

"The Thomistic explanation of how grace and free will are reconciled begins with the premise that God has eternally predetermined that some people should be saved, and to realize this aim confers effective (efficacious) graces on these elect. He therefore physically affects their free wills, and thus secures that they decide freely to cooperate with His grace. There is an inner power in efficacious grace which infallibly insures that the predestined freely consent to perform such salutary actions as will merit heaven. Consequently efficacious grace is essentially different from merely sufficient grace, which confers the power or ability to place salutary acts, but no more. Before this bare potency can be reduced to action, another and different divine help must be received, namely efficacious grace. Since God has eternally willed the free consent of His chosen ones to the efficacious graces He confers, He thus ineluctably brings about the salvation of those who are included in His loving decree. All the rest who do not come within the ambit of this election are permitted, through the abuse of their freedom, not to attain heaven. The divine motive for this negative reprobation is that God willed to manifest His goodness not only by means of His mercy, but also by means of His justice."

Many Reformed folks seem to love calling Catholics semi-pelagian, but this is pretty far from that. Thomists seem much closer to Calvinists than most Evangelicals

A Traditional Catholic friend sent me this description of the classical Thomist view of Grace/Predestination”The Thomistic explanation of how grace and free will are reconciled begins with the premise that God has eternally predetermined that some people should be saved, and to realize this aim confers effective (efficacious) graces on these elect. He therefore physically affects their free wills, and thus secures that they decide freely to cooperate with His grace. There is an inner power in efficacious grace which infallibly insures that the predestined freely consent to perform such salutary actions as will merit heaven. Consequently efficacious grace is essentially different from merely sufficient grace, which confers the power or ability to place salutary acts, but no more. Before this bare potency can be reduced to action, another and different divine help must be received, namely efficacious grace. Since God has eternally willed the free consent of His chosen ones to the efficacious graces He confers, He thus ineluctably brings about the salvation of those who are included in His loving decree. All the rest who do not come within the ambit of this election are permitted, through the abuse of their freedom, not to attain heaven. The divine motive for this negative reprobation is that God willed to manifest His goodness not only by means of His mercy, but also by means of His justice.”Many Reformed folks seem to love calling Catholics semi-pelagian, but this is pretty far from that. Thomists seem much closer to Calvinists than most Evangelicals
Link: Is there a serious difference between classical Thomism and moderate Calvinism?
Submitted by ChristianClassicist

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *