Reformed Theology Origin and nature of love (charity) in men  Calvinism

Origin and nature of love (charity) in men

Reformed Theology Origin and nature of love (charity) in men  Calvinism
Origin and nature of love (charity) in men

I read on triablogue

http://triablogue.blogspot.com.br/2014/10/thomas-aquinas-was-problem-reformation.html

About Aquinas and Peter Lombard opinions about how the love of God acts in us. Peter Lombard believed (and the posts says that is the opinion of reformed) that the love is the Spirit acting. Aquinas believed that the love is a habit created by God, but belongs to the person.

In book 1, Distinction 17 of his famed Sentences, Lombard, discussing religious justification, asked: “Is the love by which we are saved a created habit in our soul, or is it the very person of the Holy Spirit dwelling within us?” Is that which heals and saves a person part of his own nature, something he himself has developed as his own possession [inherent righteousness], or is it the indwelling spirit of God, a divine power in him but not of him [alien righteousness]?

Lombard opted for the latter solution, maintaining that the love by which people love God and their fellow man so as to merit salvation (“merit” being a whole ’nother story) was the spirit of God working internally, without their aid or volition. Man is saved by an uncreated, not a created habit, by uncreated, not created, love, by the holy spirit within, not by an acquired talent he can call his very own. When the young Luther wrote hs commentary on the Sentences in 1509/10, he strongly agreed, against the majority of scholastics, with this interpretation by Lombard.

.

Peter Lombard held that charity was not a created reality, but the Holy Spirit dwelling in the soul. He did not mean that the Holy Spirit was identified with our movement of love, but that charity, unlike the other virtues, such as faith and hope, was not elicited from a habit which was really our own. [In this] he was trying to enhance charity …. This opinion [however] tends rather to discredit charity. It would mean that active charity rises from the Holy Spirit so moving the in that we are merely passive, and not responsible for our loving or otherwise. This militates against the character of a voluntary act. Charity would not then be a voluntary act. There is a problem here, for our loving is very much our own.

According to Aquinas, grace is in the soul as a reality connatural [innate] to man; otherwise, saving acts of charity [again, the whole “merit” thing] would be done involuntarily and, as it were, by another. Although its ultimate origin is divine, the love by which people love God and their fellow man in a saving way is created love, a truly human habit.

Well, I don't know, I think that Aquinas had a point, saying that if love isn't a created habit, so man would be only a tool, a passive instrument.

What do you think? Which biblical texts supports Lombard opinion? His opinion is the reformed opinion?

I read on triabloguehttp://triablogue.blogspot.com.br/2014/10/thomas-aquinas-was-problem-reformation.htmlAbout Aquinas and Peter Lombard opinions about how the love of God acts in us. Peter Lombard believed (and the posts says that is the opinion of reformed) that the love is the Spirit acting. Aquinas believed that the love is a habit created by God, but belongs to the person.In book 1, Distinction 17 of his famed Sentences, Lombard, discussing religious justification, asked: “Is the love by which we are saved a created habit in our soul, or is it the very person of the Holy Spirit dwelling within us?” Is that which heals and saves a person part of his own nature, something he himself has developed as his own possession [inherent righteousness], or is it the indwelling spirit of God, a divine power in him but not of him [alien righteousness]?Lombard opted for the latter solution, maintaining that the love by which people love God and their fellow man so as to merit salvation (“merit” being a whole ’nother story) was the spirit of God working internally, without their aid or volition. Man is saved by an uncreated, not a created habit, by uncreated, not created, love, by the holy spirit within, not by an acquired talent he can call his very own. When the young Luther wrote hs commentary on the Sentences in 1509/10, he strongly agreed, against the majority of scholastics, with this interpretation by Lombard..Peter Lombard held that charity was not a created reality, but the Holy Spirit dwelling in the soul. He did not mean that the Holy Spirit was identified with our movement of love, but that charity, unlike the other virtues, such as faith and hope, was not elicited from a habit which was really our own. [In this] he was trying to enhance charity …. This opinion [however] tends rather to discredit charity. It would mean that active charity rises from the Holy Spirit so moving the in that we are merely passive, and not responsible for our loving or otherwise. This militates against the character of a voluntary act. Charity would not then be a voluntary act. There is a problem here, for our loving is very much our own.According to Aquinas, grace is in the soul as a reality connatural [innate] to man; otherwise, saving acts of charity [again, the whole “merit” thing] would be done involuntarily and, as it were, by another. Although its ultimate origin is divine, the love by which people love God and their fellow man in a saving way is created love, a truly human habit.Well, I don’t know, I think that Aquinas had a point, saying that if love isn’t a created habit, so man would be only a tool, a passive instrument.What do you think? Which biblical texts supports Lombard opinion? His opinion is the reformed opinion?
Link: Origin and nature of love (charity) in men
Submitted by PinoyDota88