Reformed Theology St Thomas Christians in India - why so Cathodox?  Calvinism

St Thomas Christians in India – why so Cathodox?

Reformed Theology St Thomas Christians in India - why so Cathodox?  Calvinism
St Thomas Christians in India – why so Cathodox?

Most Evangelicals think that Catholicism and Oryhodoxy went corrupt, that they invented their traditions over time. But how did the ancient Christians in India, who basically developed independently due to geography, just happen to end up with the same ecclesial and liturgical practices? For example, they call communion Qurbana, which means sacrifice. Does that mean Christianity was already corrupt when Thomas went there in AD 52? Or are the similarities just a crazy happenstance? Or are they just making it up about being founded in AD 52 by Thomas?

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Submitted by immune2viruses

Reformed Theology About Gluttony  Calvinism

About Gluttony

Reformed Theology About Gluttony  Calvinism
About Gluttony

So, as a result of a discussion I had online, I looked up gluttony. One of the first hits Google returns is, of course, this wiki article: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluttony

TIL that St. Gregory offered up five types of gluttony: 1. Eating before the time of meals in order to satisfy the palate. 2. Seeking delicacies and better quality of food to gratify the "vile sense of taste." 3. Seeking to stimulate the palate with overly or elaborately prepared food (e.g. with luxurious sauces and seasonings). 4. Exceeding the necessary quantity of food. 5. Taking food with too much eagerness, even when eating the proper amount, and even if the food is not luxurious.

I thought this was sort of interesting, and a few things jumped out at me. While I certainly view 3 and 4 as problematic, 1 and 2 aren't really. Frequently eating small meals is actually better for your digestion than 3 large ones. I can't agree that the sense of taste is vile. Is the sense of touch vile? Smell? Hearing? Sight? 5 is interesting, but he uses Esau as his example. I don't know if I could agree that his problem is eagerness for food. It was despising his birthright.

But, in light of the fact that obesity is becoming an epidemic, is there value in revisiting teachings on gluttony?

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Submitted by ruthvh

Reformed Theology Why not Catholicism  Calvinism

Why not Catholicism

Reformed Theology Why not Catholicism  Calvinism
Why not Catholicism

Are any of you ex catholics? Any of you ventured over to catholicism? I did to see what I was missing. I'm still curious as to why we don't want reunification. My problems were obvious as I looked at what the doctrine truly teaches

purgatory (unscriptural and confusing)

sacrifice of the mass (it is absolutely a representation but it's still against the epistle to Hebrews)

treasury of merits (nothing bugs me quite like this)

extreme veneration of Mary and Saints (St. Joseph statue buried upside down in front yard will make your house sell)

Vatican 2

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Submitted by Sheepish70x7

Reformed Theology Max Weber  Calvinism

Max Weber

Reformed Theology Max Weber  Calvinism
Max Weber

Have any of you read Max Weber on the long-term effects of Protestantism and especially Calvinism? Did you agree, and if so did it make you feel more or less positive about being Reformed? If you're a second generation Calvinist, did his description of the 2nd-gen spirituality / psychology / sociology line up with your personal experiences?

Do you think Reformed theology can lead to too much this-worldly activistic asceticism (eg theological study, right-wing politics or left-wing social gospel, careerism), as opposed to this-worldly mysticism (eg charismatic gifts, Eucharistic presence) or other-worldly asceticism (eg contemplative spirituality, monasticism, fasting)?

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Submitted by immune2viruses

Reformed Theology How Likely are you to Recommend a non-Christian/nominal Friend to try out a tradition other than your own? Are there ever times where recommending the Roman Catholic Church is okay? (thought experiment)  Calvinism

How Likely are you to Recommend a non-Christian/nominal Friend to try out a tradition other than your own? Are there ever times where recommending the Roman Catholic Church is okay? (thought experiment)

Reformed Theology How Likely are you to Recommend a non-Christian/nominal Friend to try out a tradition other than your own? Are there ever times where recommending the Roman Catholic Church is okay? (thought experiment)  Calvinism
How Likely are you to Recommend a non-Christian/nominal Friend to try out a tradition other than your own? Are there ever times where recommending the Roman Catholic Church is okay? (thought experiment)
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Submitted by cnumbers

Reformed Theology Week 34 - Let's Read the Heidelberg Catechism!  Calvinism

Week 34 – Let’s Read the Heidelberg Catechism!

Reformed Theology Week 34 - Let's Read the Heidelberg Catechism!  Calvinism
Week 34 – Let’s Read the Heidelberg Catechism!

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

Lord's Day 34

Q&A 92

Q. What is God's law?

A. God spoke all these words:

THE FIRST COMMANDMENT "I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery; you shall have no other gods before me."

THE SECOND COMMANDMENT "You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I the LORD your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and the fourth generation of those who reject me, but showing love to the thousandth generation of those who love me and keep my commandments."

THE THIRD COMMANDMENT "You shall not make wrongful use of the name of the LORD your God, for the LORD will not acquit anyone who misuses his name."

THE FOURTH COMMANDMENT "Remember the sabbath day, and keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work. But the seventh day is a sabbath to the LORD your God; you shall not do any work—you, your son or your daughter, your male or female slave, your livestock, or the alien resident in your towns. For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but rested the seventh day; therefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day and consecrated it."

THE FIFTH COMMANDMENT "Honor your father and your mother, so that your days may be long in the land that the LORD your God is giving to you."

THE SIXTH COMMANDMENT "You shall not murder."

THE SEVENTH COMMANDMENT "You shall not commit adultery."

THE EIGHTH COMMANDMENT "You shall not steal."

THE NINTH COMMANDMENT "You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor."

THE TENTH COMMANDMENT "You shall not covet your neighbor's house; you shall not covet your neighbor's wife, or male or female slave, or ox, or donkey, or anything that belongs to your neighbor."1

1 Ex. 20:1-17; Deut. 5:6-21

Q&A 93

Q. How are these commandments divided?

A. Into two tables. The first has four commandments, teaching us how we ought to live in relation to God. The second has six commandments, teaching us what we owe our neighbor.1

1 Matt. 22:37-39

Q&A 94

Q. What does the Lord require in the first commandment?

A. That I, not wanting to endanger my own salvation, avoid and shun all idolatry,1 sorcery, superstitious rites,2 and prayer to saints or to other creatures.3

That I rightly know the only true God,4 trust him alone,5 and look to God for every good thing6 humbly7 and patiently,8 and love,9 fear,10 and honor11 God with all my heart.

In short, that I give up anything rather than go against God's will in any way.12

1 1 Cor. 6:9-10; 10:5-14; 1 John 5:21

2 Lev. 19:31; Deut. 18:9-12

3 Matt. 4:10; Rev. 19:10; 22:8-9

4 John 17:3

5 Jer. 17:5, 7

6 Ps. 104:27-28; James 1:17

7 1 Pet. 5:5-6

8 Col. 1:11; Heb. 10:36

9 Matt. 22:37 (Deut. 6:5)

10 Prov. 9:10; 1 Pet. 1:17

11 Matt. 4:10 (Deut. 6:13)

12 Matt. 5:29-30; 10:37-39

Q&A 95

Q. What is idolatry?

A. Idolatry is having or inventing something in which one trusts in place of or alongside of the only true God, who has revealed himself in the Word.1

1 1 Chron. 16:26; Gal. 4:8-9; Eph. 5:5; Phil. 3:19

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Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology Choice is a useful concept, even if it isn't an accurate one  Calvinism

Choice is a useful concept, even if it isn’t an accurate one

Reformed Theology Choice is a useful concept, even if it isn't an accurate one  Calvinism
Choice is a useful concept, even if it isn’t an accurate one

I was talking to a baptist today and we were discussing how I evangelise as a reformed person (and why I evangelise) and at one point I basically said that I ask the person to choose to accept God. In fact… I frequently imply that the person I'm talking to can choose to accept God.

And after a discussion about whether this was appropriate I said that for somebody who doesn't have a belief in God to serve as a theological basis for understanding Calvinist doctrine, speaking of choice is the best. Like, I think I have a good understanding of the extent to which I "chose" Christianity and the reality that I was unconditionally elected by God.

However, if you tell an atheist that then they will get confused at best and at worse will come to the conclusion that they must just be predestined to be an unbeliever and then they will never "choose" God. It's like when you tell a child that they can't forget to blink because it's a reflex, and then with the knowledge that it's a reflex they proceed to consciously neglect breathing and end up going blue (which I have heard is a genuine concept).

I think if you tell atheists that the decision to accept God is beyond our control, then a lot of them will consciously shut God out with an "if it happens it happens" attitude that isn't helpful.

And all of this culminated in me saying that choice is a useful concept, even if it isn't an accurate one. Which I thought was quite a good summary.

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Submitted by FriendlyCommie