Reformed Theology Question about deferring to authority  Calvinism

Question about deferring to authority

Reformed Theology Question about deferring to authority  Calvinism
Question about deferring to authority

Something that I have been hearing lately more and more is that unless I have more formal learning, scholarship, or degrees on a given topic, be it theology, science, politics, or anything else, than another individual, I should just submit to their teaching and not criticize it at all. For example, I took a class last year on the letters of Paul. The professor was a PhD who had studied the Bible for like twenty years, and had degrees both in the Old and New Testament, and knew both Greek and Hebrew. He made a lot of statements throughout the semester that I perceived to be anti gospel. In the first class, he told us he took issue with the Protestant doctrine of justification by faith. He stated that Martin Luther was wrong. He regularly lamented about how many young people listened to John Piper's sermons. He stated that salvation is just a metaphor. He is universalist. I got the feeling that he was more about in the infusion of righteousness camp rather than the imputation camp. He was a pretty nice guy, but a lot of what he said made me uneasy. When I brought this uneasiness up to a classmate, he essentially just told me that our professor was the expert and we should just accept most of what he said. A guy who had studied the bible academically for twenty years obviously would understand the gospel better than some undergraduate junior in college. How am I supposed to respond to things like this, where if I question, I'm just told I'm not qualified enough to criticize the scholar? This is really pertinent with gospel issues.

Something that I have been hearing lately more and more is that unless I have more formal learning, scholarship, or degrees on a given topic, be it theology, science, politics, or anything else, than another individual, I should just submit to their teaching and not criticize it at all. For example, I took a class last year on the letters of Paul. The professor was a PhD who had studied the Bible for like twenty years, and had degrees both in the Old and New Testament, and knew both Greek and Hebrew. He made a lot of statements throughout the semester that I perceived to be anti gospel. In the first class, he told us he took issue with the Protestant doctrine of justification by faith. He stated that Martin Luther was wrong. He regularly lamented about how many young people listened to John Piper's sermons. He stated that salvation is just a metaphor. He is universalist. I got the feeling that he was more about in the infusion of righteousness camp rather than the imputation camp. He was a pretty nice guy, but a lot of what he said made me uneasy. When I brought this uneasiness up to a classmate, he essentially just told me that our professor was the expert and we should just accept most of what he said. A guy who had studied the bible academically for twenty years obviously would understand the gospel better than some undergraduate junior in college. How am I supposed to respond to things like this, where if I question, I'm just told I'm not qualified enough to criticize the scholar? This is really pertinent with gospel issues.

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Submitted March 14, 2017 at 12:01PM by centurion88