Reformed Theology Diarmaid MacCulloch explains how the Psalter helped ignite and unite French protestants. This is a good passage from his book on the history of The Reformation.  Calvinism

Diarmaid MacCulloch explains how the Psalter helped ignite and unite French protestants. This is a good passage from his book on the history of The Reformation.

Reformed Theology Diarmaid MacCulloch explains how the Psalter helped ignite and unite French protestants. This is a good passage from his book on the history of The Reformation.  Calvinism
Diarmaid MacCulloch explains how the Psalter helped ignite and unite French protestants. This is a good passage from his book on the history of The Reformation.
http://resident-theologian.blogspot.com/2017/07/diarmaid-macculloch-on-psalter-as.html
http://resident-theologian.blogspot.com/2017/07/diarmaid-macculloch-on-psalter-as.html
Link: Diarmaid MacCulloch explains how the Psalter helped ignite and unite French protestants. This is a good passage from his book on the history of The Reformation.
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology The King’s College of Cambridge’s Nine Lessons and Carols is online for those looking to add to their Christmas playlist.  Calvinism

The King’s College of Cambridge’s Nine Lessons and Carols is online for those looking to add to their Christmas playlist.

Reformed Theology The King’s College of Cambridge’s Nine Lessons and Carols is online for those looking to add to their Christmas playlist.  Calvinism
The King’s College of Cambridge’s Nine Lessons and Carols is online for those looking to add to their Christmas playlist.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09jr627
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09jr627
Link: The King’s College of Cambridge’s Nine Lessons and Carols is online for those looking to add to their Christmas playlist.
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology Tim Keller's Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God  Calvinism

Tim Keller’s Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God

Reformed Theology Tim Keller's Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God  Calvinism
Tim Keller’s Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God

Somehow, I missed this book when it came out three years ago. If you missed it too, find it immediately. It's easily my favorite of his books. He mined classic volumes on prayer from Augustine, Calvin, Luther, Matthew Henry, J.I. Packer, Athanasius, John Owen, and others and created a practical primer on prayer.

Somehow, I missed this book when it came out three years ago. If you missed it too, find it immediately. It’s easily my favorite of his books. He mined classic volumes on prayer from Augustine, Calvin, Luther, Matthew Henry, J.I. Packer, Athanasius, John Owen, and others and created a practical primer on prayer.
Link: Tim Keller’s Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology "It's one thing to say 'HEAVENLY FATHER YOU ARE SOVEREIGN OVER ALL OF YOUR CREATION' but entirely another to say 'Heavenly Father you are sovereign in my little world.' Really? . . . We must learn to doubt our doubts as much as we doubt our certainties." - Alistair Begg  Calvinism

“It’s one thing to say ‘HEAVENLY FATHER YOU ARE SOVEREIGN OVER ALL OF YOUR CREATION’ but entirely another to say ‘Heavenly Father you are sovereign in my little world.’ Really? . . . We must learn to doubt our doubts as much as we doubt our certainties.” – Alistair Begg

Reformed Theology "It's one thing to say 'HEAVENLY FATHER YOU ARE SOVEREIGN OVER ALL OF YOUR CREATION' but entirely another to say 'Heavenly Father you are sovereign in my little world.' Really? . . . We must learn to doubt our doubts as much as we doubt our certainties." - Alistair Begg  Calvinism
“It’s one thing to say ‘HEAVENLY FATHER YOU ARE SOVEREIGN OVER ALL OF YOUR CREATION’ but entirely another to say ‘Heavenly Father you are sovereign in my little world.’ Really? . . . We must learn to doubt our doubts as much as we doubt our certainties.” – Alistair Begg
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No text found
Link: “It’s one thing to say ‘HEAVENLY FATHER YOU ARE SOVEREIGN OVER ALL OF YOUR CREATION’ but entirely another to say ‘Heavenly Father you are sovereign in my little world.’ Really? . . . We must learn to doubt our doubts as much as we doubt our certainties.” – Alistair Begg
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology Comparing the Shorter Catechism and Heidelberg’s answers to “what are God’s works of providence?” (Q.11, top) And “what dost thou mean by the providence of God?” (Q.27, bottom). The WSC is concise and direct; the Heidelberg is poetry.  Calvinism

Comparing the Shorter Catechism and Heidelberg’s answers to “what are God’s works of providence?” (Q.11, top) And “what dost thou mean by the providence of God?” (Q.27, bottom). The WSC is concise and direct; the Heidelberg is poetry.

Reformed Theology Comparing the Shorter Catechism and Heidelberg’s answers to “what are God’s works of providence?” (Q.11, top) And “what dost thou mean by the providence of God?” (Q.27, bottom). The WSC is concise and direct; the Heidelberg is poetry.  Calvinism
Comparing the Shorter Catechism and Heidelberg’s answers to “what are God’s works of providence?” (Q.11, top) And “what dost thou mean by the providence of God?” (Q.27, bottom). The WSC is concise and direct; the Heidelberg is poetry.
https://i.redd.it/rw4lvhryb1sz.jpg
https://i.redd.it/rw4lvhryb1sz.jpg
Link: Comparing the Shorter Catechism and Heidelberg’s answers to “what are God’s works of providence?” (Q.11, top) And “what dost thou mean by the providence of God?” (Q.27, bottom). The WSC is concise and direct; the Heidelberg is poetry.
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology Jude Question  Calvinism

Jude Question

Reformed Theology Jude Question  Calvinism
Jude Question

Jude is a puzzling little book. I was recently struck by the verb tense in the sixth verse: "And the angels who did not stay within their own position of authority, but left their proper dwelling, he has kept in eternal chains under gloomy darkness until the judgment of the great day—" We tend to think of Satan and the demonic forces as being fallen angels (following hints from Ezekiel 28, Luke 10 and other verses). We also think of Satan's forces as still very active in the world (1 Peter 5:8, I Thess 2:17-18, etc.). In what sense then have the fallen angels been kept chained up? Is this some reference to them only being able to tempt or do within certain boundaries of authority allowed by God (Job)? Is earth the gloomy darkness? Are these different fallen angels?

Jude is a puzzling little book. I was recently struck by the verb tense in the sixth verse: “And the angels who did not stay within their own position of authority, but left their proper dwelling, he has kept in eternal chains under gloomy darkness until the judgment of the great day—” We tend to think of Satan and the demonic forces as being fallen angels (following hints from Ezekiel 28, Luke 10 and other verses). We also think of Satan’s forces as still very active in the world (1 Peter 5:8, I Thess 2:17-18, etc.). In what sense then have the fallen angels been kept chained up? Is this some reference to them only being able to tempt or do within certain boundaries of authority allowed by God (Job)? Is earth the gloomy darkness? Are these different fallen angels?
Link: Jude Question
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology Earnest questions for which I have no immediate answer.  Calvinism

Earnest questions for which I have no immediate answer.

Reformed Theology Earnest questions for which I have no immediate answer.  Calvinism
Earnest questions for which I have no immediate answer.

There's been a problem facing African missionaries for centuries: If a polygamist comes to Christ, what do you do about the prior unbiblical marriages he has entered into. Many thoughtful, orthodox people have come to the conclusion that the best answer is to tell them to keep the marriages they have but not to add more wives.. This is not a universally held position, but is a scripturally supportable answer to a sticky problem.

Let's move geographically to our own country. A woman has married another woman. She later comes to Christ. Do we counsel her:

  • that she must divorce to join the church?
  • to stay married but end marital relations?
    *to live with the consequences of her past mistake and remain married and faithful in the marriage she finds herself in?

I would hate to counsel divorce not only as a general "the Bible hates divorce" but also because it could leave the unbelieving spouse bitter towards the church and Christianity and potentially unsupported financially.

I would hate to counsel staying married but ending marital relations on I Cor 7 grounds. Practically and scripturally, the position feels untenable.

Remaining married feels untenable in light of the New Testament's specific references to homosexual behavior in the various "vice lists." It would feel odd however to my mind to say that this arrangement is somehow worse or less tolerable than polygamist relationships which are taken as "past sin you have to live with."

Any thoughts?

There’s been a problem facing African missionaries for centuries: If a polygamist comes to Christ, what do you do about the prior unbiblical marriages he has entered into. Many thoughtful, orthodox people have come to the conclusion that the best answer is to tell them to keep the marriages they have but not to add more wives.. This is not a universally held position, but is a scripturally supportable answer to a sticky problem.Let’s move geographically to our own country. A woman has married another woman. She later comes to Christ. Do we counsel her:that she must divorce to join the church?to stay married but end marital relations?*to live with the consequences of her past mistake and remain married and faithful in the marriage she finds herself in?I would hate to counsel divorce not only as a general “the Bible hates divorce” but also because it could leave the unbelieving spouse bitter towards the church and Christianity and potentially unsupported financially.I would hate to counsel staying married but ending marital relations on I Cor 7 grounds. Practically and scripturally, the position feels untenable.Remaining married feels untenable in light of the New Testament’s specific references to homosexual behavior in the various “vice lists.” It would feel odd however to my mind to say that this arrangement is somehow worse or less tolerable than polygamist relationships which are taken as “past sin you have to live with.”Any thoughts?
Link: Earnest questions for which I have no immediate answer.
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology Charles Spurgeon on Psalm 4  Calvinism

Charles Spurgeon on Psalm 4

Reformed Theology Charles Spurgeon on Psalm 4  Calvinism
Charles Spurgeon on Psalm 4

"It is not to be imagined that he who has helped us in six troubles will leave us in the seventh. God does nothing by halves, and he will never cease to help us until we cease to need. The manna shall fall every morning until we cross the Jordan."

“It is not to be imagined that he who has helped us in six troubles will leave us in the seventh. God does nothing by halves, and he will never cease to help us until we cease to need. The manna shall fall every morning until we cross the Jordan.”
Link: Charles Spurgeon on Psalm 4
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology Good, short article by Kevin DeYoung on the common themes in the "sin lists" in the New Testament.  Calvinism

Good, short article by Kevin DeYoung on the common themes in the “sin lists” in the New Testament.

Reformed Theology Good, short article by Kevin DeYoung on the common themes in the "sin lists" in the New Testament.  Calvinism
Good, short article by Kevin DeYoung on the common themes in the “sin lists” in the New Testament.
https://blogs.thegospelcoalition.org/kevindeyoung/2017/09/08/serious-sins/?platform=hootsuite
https://blogs.thegospelcoalition.org/kevindeyoung/2017/09/08/serious-sins/?platform=hootsuite
Link: Good, short article by Kevin DeYoung on the common themes in the “sin lists” in the New Testament.
Submitted by ClarenceColton

Reformed Theology Martyn Lloyd-Jones on Being the Salt of the Earth  Calvinism

Martyn Lloyd-Jones on Being the Salt of the Earth

Reformed Theology Martyn Lloyd-Jones on Being the Salt of the Earth  Calvinism
Martyn Lloyd-Jones on Being the Salt of the Earth

Full text here. Entire series here.

There are those who say that the Christian should act as salt in the earth by means of the Church's making pronouncements about the general situation of the world, about political, economic and international affairs and other such subjects. . . . People denounce communism, and talk about war, the international situation, and other similar problems. They say that the Christian functions as salt in the earth in this general way, by making these comments upon the world situation.

. . .

I suggest to you, therefore, that the Christian is to function as the salt of the earth in a much more individual sense. He does so by his individual life and character, by just being the man that he is in every sphere in which he finds himself.

. . .

The primary task of the Church is to evangelize and to preach the gospel. Look at it like this. If the Christian Church today spends most of her time in denouncing communism, it seems to me that the main result will be that communists will not be likely to listen to the preaching of the gospel. If the Church is always denouncing one particular section of society, she is shutting the evangelistic door upon that section. If we take the New Testament view of these matters we must believe that the communist has a soul to be saved in exactly the same way as everybody else. It is my business as a preacher of the gospel, and a representative of the Church, to evangelize all kinds and conditions and classes of men and women. The moment the Church begins to intervene in these political, social and economic matters, therefore, she is hampering and hindering herself in her God-appointed task of evangelism. She can no longer say that she "knows no man after the flesh", and thereby she is sinning. Let the individual play his part as a citizen, and belong to any political party that he may choose. That is something for the individual to decide. The Church is not concerned as a Church about these things. Our business is to preach the gospel and to bring this message of salvation to all. And, thank God, communists can be converted and can be saved. The Church is to be concerned about sin in all its manifestations, and sin can be as terrible in a capitalist as in a communist; it can be as terrible in a rich man as in a poor man; it can manifest itself in all classes and in all types and in all groups.

Full text here. Entire series here.There are those who say that the Christian should act as salt in the earth by means of the Church’s making pronouncements about the general situation of the world, about political, economic and international affairs and other such subjects. . . . People denounce communism, and talk about war, the international situation, and other similar problems. They say that the Christian functions as salt in the earth in this general way, by making these comments upon the world situation.. . .I suggest to you, therefore, that the Christian is to function as the salt of the earth in a much more individual sense. He does so by his individual life and character, by just being the man that he is in every sphere in which he finds himself.. . .The primary task of the Church is to evangelize and to preach the gospel. Look at it like this. If the Christian Church today spends most of her time in denouncing communism, it seems to me that the main result will be that communists will not be likely to listen to the preaching of the gospel. If the Church is always denouncing one particular section of society, she is shutting the evangelistic door upon that section. If we take the New Testament view of these matters we must believe that the communist has a soul to be saved in exactly the same way as everybody else. It is my business as a preacher of the gospel, and a representative of the Church, to evangelize all kinds and conditions and classes of men and women. The moment the Church begins to intervene in these political, social and economic matters, therefore, she is hampering and hindering herself in her God-appointed task of evangelism. She can no longer say that she “knows no man after the flesh”, and thereby she is sinning. Let the individual play his part as a citizen, and belong to any political party that he may choose. That is something for the individual to decide. The Church is not concerned as a Church about these things. Our business is to preach the gospel and to bring this message of salvation to all. And, thank God, communists can be converted and can be saved. The Church is to be concerned about sin in all its manifestations, and sin can be as terrible in a capitalist as in a communist; it can be as terrible in a rich man as in a poor man; it can manifest itself in all classes and in all types and in all groups.
Link: Martyn Lloyd-Jones on Being the Salt of the Earth
Submitted by ClarenceColton