Reformed Theology HypePriest Justin Bieber Posts Photo of Reading the Bible  Calvinism

HypePriest Justin Bieber Posts Photo of Reading the Bible

Reformed Theology HypePriest Justin Bieber Posts Photo of Reading the Bible  Calvinism
HypePriest Justin Bieber Posts Photo of Reading the Bible
https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/entertainment/2018/january/justin-bieber-posts-photo-of-reading-the-bible-to-his-95m-instagram-followers
https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/entertainment/2018/january/justin-bieber-posts-photo-of-reading-the-bible-to-his-95m-instagram-followers
Link: HypePriest Justin Bieber Posts Photo of Reading the Bible
Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology Let's Read the New City Catechism! Week 2  Calvinism

Let’s Read the New City Catechism! Week 2

Reformed Theology Let's Read the New City Catechism! Week 2  Calvinism
Let’s Read the New City Catechism! Week 2

Question 2

Q. What is God?

A. God is the creator and sustainer of everyone and everything. He is eternal, infinite, and unchangeable in his power and perfection, goodness and glory, wisdom, justice, and truth. Nothing happens except through him and by his will.

Psalm 86:8–10, 15

There is none like you among the gods, O Lord,

nor are there any works like yours.

All the nations you have made shall come

and worship before you, O Lord,

and shall glorify your name.

For you are great and do wondrous things;

you alone are God. . . .

But you, O Lord, are a God merciful and gracious,

slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.

Commentary

Jonathan Edwards

The Creator of the world is doubtless also the Governor of it. He that had power to give being to the world, and set all the parts of it in order, has doubtless power to dispose of the world, to continue the order he has constituted, or to alter it. He that first gave the laws of nature, must have all nature in his hands; so that it is evident God has the world in his hands, to dispose of as he pleases. . . . And it is manifest, in fact, that God is not careless how the affairs and concerns of the world he has made proceed, because he was not careless of this matter in the creation itself; as it is apparent, by the manner and order in which things were created, that God, in creating, took care of the future progress and state of things in the world.

D. A. Carson

It is spectacularly wonderful to talk about God, to think about him. There cannot be any higher subject. But the word God itself is not an empty cipher. Just because somebody uses the word God and then somebody else uses the word God, it does not follow that they mean the same thing. God, for some, is an inexpressible feeling, or it’s the unmoved cause at the beginning of the universe, or it’s a being full of transcendence. But we’re talking about the God of the Bible, and the God of the Bible is self-defined. He talks about himself as being eternal and righteous. He’s the God of love. He’s the God of transcendence; that is, he’s above space and time and history. Yet he is the immanent God; that is, he is so much with us that we cannot possibly escape from him. He is everywhere. He is unchangeable. He is truthful. He is reliable. He’s personal. What’s really important to see and understand, as God has disclosed himself not only in words but in the whole storyline of the Bible’s narrative, is that we are not permitted to take one attribute of God and make everything of it. We cannot, let’s say, take his sovereignty and forget his goodness. Or take his goodness and forget his holiness (his holiness is what makes him the God of judgment). Or take his judgment, even the severity of his judgment, and forget that he’s the God of love, the God who has so much loved even his rebellious creatures that ultimately he sent his Son to bear their sin in his own body on the tree. In other words, to get to the heart of who God is and to bow before him in some small measure of genuine understanding, it’s important to think through what the Bible says again and again and integrate the whole with the same balance and proportion that Scripture itself gives. That calls us to worship. And if we put anything else in the place of God, that is the very definition of idolatry.

Prayer

Our Creator and Sustainer, everything holds together in you. The smallest creature is known to you, and the mightiest army is at your command. You rule with justice. Help us to trust your goodness in all that you will. Amen.

Question 2Q. What is God?A. God is the creator and sustainer of everyone and everything. He is eternal, infinite, and unchangeable in his power and perfection, goodness and glory, wisdom, justice, and truth. Nothing happens except through him and by his will.Psalm 86:8–10, 15There is none like you among the gods, O Lord,nor are there any works like yours.All the nations you have made shall comeand worship before you, O Lord,and shall glorify your name.For you are great and do wondrous things;you alone are God. . . .But you, O Lord, are a God merciful and gracious,slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.CommentaryJonathan EdwardsThe Creator of the world is doubtless also the Governor of it. He that had power to give being to the world, and set all the parts of it in order, has doubtless power to dispose of the world, to continue the order he has constituted, or to alter it. He that first gave the laws of nature, must have all nature in his hands; so that it is evident God has the world in his hands, to dispose of as he pleases. . . . And it is manifest, in fact, that God is not careless how the affairs and concerns of the world he has made proceed, because he was not careless of this matter in the creation itself; as it is apparent, by the manner and order in which things were created, that God, in creating, took care of the future progress and state of things in the world.D. A. CarsonIt is spectacularly wonderful to talk about God, to think about him. There cannot be any higher subject. But the word God itself is not an empty cipher. Just because somebody uses the word God and then somebody else uses the word God, it does not follow that they mean the same thing. God, for some, is an inexpressible feeling, or it’s the unmoved cause at the beginning of the universe, or it’s a being full of transcendence. But we’re talking about the God of the Bible, and the God of the Bible is self-defined. He talks about himself as being eternal and righteous. He’s the God of love. He’s the God of transcendence; that is, he’s above space and time and history. Yet he is the immanent God; that is, he is so much with us that we cannot possibly escape from him. He is everywhere. He is unchangeable. He is truthful. He is reliable. He’s personal. What’s really important to see and understand, as God has disclosed himself not only in words but in the whole storyline of the Bible’s narrative, is that we are not permitted to take one attribute of God and make everything of it. We cannot, let’s say, take his sovereignty and forget his goodness. Or take his goodness and forget his holiness (his holiness is what makes him the God of judgment). Or take his judgment, even the severity of his judgment, and forget that he’s the God of love, the God who has so much loved even his rebellious creatures that ultimately he sent his Son to bear their sin in his own body on the tree. In other words, to get to the heart of who God is and to bow before him in some small measure of genuine understanding, it’s important to think through what the Bible says again and again and integrate the whole with the same balance and proportion that Scripture itself gives. That calls us to worship. And if we put anything else in the place of God, that is the very definition of idolatry.PrayerOur Creator and Sustainer, everything holds together in you. The smallest creature is known to you, and the mightiest army is at your command. You rule with justice. Help us to trust your goodness in all that you will. Amen.
Link: Let’s Read the New City Catechism! Week 2
Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology CT: Moody Bible President and COO Both Resign, Provost Retires  Calvinism

CT: Moody Bible President and COO Both Resign, Provost Retires

Reformed Theology CT: Moody Bible President and COO Both Resign, Provost Retires  Calvinism
CT: Moody Bible President and COO Both Resign, Provost Retires
http://lists.christianitytoday.com/t/559679237/25090584/11690967/0/?c73c8e04=Y3R3ZWVrbHktaHRtbA%3d%3d&4f415564=MjUwOTA1ODQ%3d&e5e2987d=NTU5Njc5MjM3&x=01f6fab5
http://lists.christianitytoday.com/t/559679237/25090584/11690967/0/?c73c8e04=Y3R3ZWVrbHktaHRtbA%3d%3d&4f415564=MjUwOTA1ODQ%3d&e5e2987d=NTU5Njc5MjM3&x=01f6fab5
Link: CT: Moody Bible President and COO Both Resign, Provost Retires
Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology TIL the interim moderator of the MCC is in a polyamorous relationship, and the UCC is deciding whether or not polyamorous people can be ordained into ministry.  Calvinism

TIL the interim moderator of the MCC is in a polyamorous relationship, and the UCC is deciding whether or not polyamorous people can be ordained into ministry.

Reformed Theology TIL the interim moderator of the MCC is in a polyamorous relationship, and the UCC is deciding whether or not polyamorous people can be ordained into ministry.  Calvinism
TIL the interim moderator of the MCC is in a polyamorous relationship, and the UCC is deciding whether or not polyamorous people can be ordained into ministry.
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No text found
Link: TIL the interim moderator of the MCC is in a polyamorous relationship, and the UCC is deciding whether or not polyamorous people can be ordained into ministry.
Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology Let's Read the New City Catechism! Week 1  Calvinism

Let’s Read the New City Catechism! Week 1

Reformed Theology Let's Read the New City Catechism! Week 1  Calvinism
Let’s Read the New City Catechism! Week 1

Question 1

Q. What is our only hope in life and death?

A. That we are not our own but belong, body and soul, both in life and death, to God and to our Savior Jesus Christ.

Romans 14:7–8

For none of us lives to himself, and none of us dies to himself. For if we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord. So then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s.

Commentary

John Calvin

If we, then, are not our own but the Lord’s, it is clear what error we must flee, and whither we must direct all the acts of our life. We are not our own: let not our reason nor our will, therefore, sway our plans and deeds. We are not our own: let us therefore not set it as our goal to seek what is expedient for us. . . . We are not our own: in so far as we can, let us forget ourselves and all that is ours. Conversely, we are God’s: let us therefore live for him and die for him. We are God’s: let his wisdom and will therefore rule all our actions. We are God’s: let all the parts of our life accordingly strive toward him as our only lawful goal. O, how much has that man profited who, having been taught that he is not his own, has taken away dominion and rule from his own reason that he may yield it to God! For, as consulting our self-interest is the pestilence that most effectively leads to our destruction, so the sole haven of salvation is to be wise in nothing and to will nothing through ourselves but to follow the leading of the Lord alone.

Timothy Keller

At one point in his writings John Calvin lays out the essence of what it means to live the Christian life. He says that he could make us a list of the commandments we should be keeping or a list of all the character traits we should be exhibiting. But instead, he wants to boil it down to the basic motive and the basic principle of what it means to live the Christian life. The basic motive is that God sent his Son to save us by grace and to adopt us into his family. So now, because of that grace, in our gratitude, we want to resemble our Father. We want the family resemblance. We want to look like our Savior. We want to please our Father. The basic principle then is this: that we are not to live to please ourselves. We’re not to live as if we belong to ourselves. And that means several things. It means, first of all, we are not to determine for ourselves what is right or wrong. We give up the right to determine that, and we rely wholly on God’s Word. We also give up the operating principle that we usually use in day-to-day life; we stop putting ourselves first, and we always put first what pleases God and what loves our neighbor. It also means that we are to have no part of our lives that is immune from self-giving. We’re supposed to give ourselves wholly to him—body and soul. And it means we trust God through thick and thin, through the good and the bad times, in life and in death. And how do the motive and the principle relate? Because we’re saved by grace, we’re not our own. A woman once said to me, “If I knew I was saved because of what I did, if I contributed to my salvation, then God couldn’t ask anything of me because I’d made a contribution. But if I’m saved by grace, sheer grace, then there’s nothing he cannot ask of me.” And that’s right. You’re not your own. You were bought with a price. Some years ago I heard a Christian speaker say, “How can you come to grips with someone who has given himself utterly for you without you giving yourself utterly for him?” Jesus gave himself wholly for us. So now, we must give ourselves wholly to him.

Prayer

Christ Our Hope, in life and in death, we cast ourselves on your merciful, fatherly care. You love us because we are your own. We have no good apart from you, and we could ask for no greater gift than to belong to you. Amen.

Question 1Q. What is our only hope in life and death?A. That we are not our own but belong, body and soul, both in life and death, to God and to our Savior Jesus Christ.Romans 14:7–8For none of us lives to himself, and none of us dies to himself. For if we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord. So then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s.CommentaryJohn CalvinIf we, then, are not our own but the Lord’s, it is clear what error we must flee, and whither we must direct all the acts of our life. We are not our own: let not our reason nor our will, therefore, sway our plans and deeds. We are not our own: let us therefore not set it as our goal to seek what is expedient for us. . . . We are not our own: in so far as we can, let us forget ourselves and all that is ours. Conversely, we are God’s: let us therefore live for him and die for him. We are God’s: let his wisdom and will therefore rule all our actions. We are God’s: let all the parts of our life accordingly strive toward him as our only lawful goal. O, how much has that man profited who, having been taught that he is not his own, has taken away dominion and rule from his own reason that he may yield it to God! For, as consulting our self-interest is the pestilence that most effectively leads to our destruction, so the sole haven of salvation is to be wise in nothing and to will nothing through ourselves but to follow the leading of the Lord alone.Timothy KellerAt one point in his writings John Calvin lays out the essence of what it means to live the Christian life. He says that he could make us a list of the commandments we should be keeping or a list of all the character traits we should be exhibiting. But instead, he wants to boil it down to the basic motive and the basic principle of what it means to live the Christian life. The basic motive is that God sent his Son to save us by grace and to adopt us into his family. So now, because of that grace, in our gratitude, we want to resemble our Father. We want the family resemblance. We want to look like our Savior. We want to please our Father. The basic principle then is this: that we are not to live to please ourselves. We’re not to live as if we belong to ourselves. And that means several things. It means, first of all, we are not to determine for ourselves what is right or wrong. We give up the right to determine that, and we rely wholly on God’s Word. We also give up the operating principle that we usually use in day-to-day life; we stop putting ourselves first, and we always put first what pleases God and what loves our neighbor. It also means that we are to have no part of our lives that is immune from self-giving. We’re supposed to give ourselves wholly to him—body and soul. And it means we trust God through thick and thin, through the good and the bad times, in life and in death. And how do the motive and the principle relate? Because we’re saved by grace, we’re not our own. A woman once said to me, “If I knew I was saved because of what I did, if I contributed to my salvation, then God couldn’t ask anything of me because I’d made a contribution. But if I’m saved by grace, sheer grace, then there’s nothing he cannot ask of me.” And that’s right. You’re not your own. You were bought with a price. Some years ago I heard a Christian speaker say, “How can you come to grips with someone who has given himself utterly for you without you giving yourself utterly for him?” Jesus gave himself wholly for us. So now, we must give ourselves wholly to him.PrayerChrist Our Hope, in life and in death, we cast ourselves on your merciful, fatherly care. You love us because we are your own. We have no good apart from you, and we could ask for no greater gift than to belong to you. Amen.
Link: Let’s Read the New City Catechism! Week 1
Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money  Calvinism

What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money

Reformed Theology What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money  Calvinism
What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money
http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2018/january-web-only/tim-keller-michael-gerson-united-states-budget-foreign-aid.html
http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2018/january-web-only/tim-keller-michael-gerson-united-states-budget-foreign-aid.html
Link: What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money
Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money  Calvinism

What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money

Reformed Theology What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money  Calvinism
What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money
http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2018/january-web-only/tim-keller-michael-gerson-united-states-budget-foreign-aid.html
http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2018/january-web-only/tim-keller-michael-gerson-united-states-budget-foreign-aid.html
Link: What Tim Keller and Michael Gerson Want You to Know About How America Spends Its Money
Submitted by rev_run_d

Reformed Theology For a Man to Grow Beyond Perpetual Adolescence - Rev. Dr. Chuck DeGroat  Calvinism

For a Man to Grow Beyond Perpetual Adolescence – Rev. Dr. Chuck DeGroat

Reformed Theology For a Man to Grow Beyond Perpetual Adolescence - Rev. Dr. Chuck DeGroat  Calvinism
For a Man to Grow Beyond Perpetual Adolescence – Rev. Dr. Chuck DeGroat

For a man to grow beyond perpetual adolescence, there must be some kind of disruption, disorientation, even despair. He must be faced with the inadequacy, even the impossibility of continuing to live as an emotional 12-year-old. These disruptions can be immensely shaming – being caught in an addiction, being confronted by a spouse, facing a health crisis, experiencing failure at work – and sometimes the shame can be so great that the man decides against growing up in favor of continuing the cycle of perpetual adolescence. This is especially the case for men on the narcissistic spectrum, whose defensive compensatory posture avoids exposure at all costs. However, men must go through the initiation they did not receive in their formative adolescent years, a great failure of their fathers and elders. This process of “dying“ is not at all the end, but the beginning of a life of wholeheartedness in which he can truly see and love the other, even the other in himself. It requires great grief and immense courage.

For a man to grow beyond perpetual adolescence, there must be some kind of disruption, disorientation, even despair. He must be faced with the inadequacy, even the impossibility of continuing to live as an emotional 12-year-old. These disruptions can be immensely shaming – being caught in an addiction, being confronted by a spouse, facing a health crisis, experiencing failure at work – and sometimes the shame can be so great that the man decides against growing up in favor of continuing the cycle of perpetual adolescence. This is especially the case for men on the narcissistic spectrum, whose defensive compensatory posture avoids exposure at all costs. However, men must go through the initiation they did not receive in their formative adolescent years, a great failure of their fathers and elders. This process of “dying“ is not at all the end, but the beginning of a life of wholeheartedness in which he can truly see and love the other, even the other in himself. It requires great grief and immense courage.
Link: For a Man to Grow Beyond Perpetual Adolescence – Rev. Dr. Chuck DeGroat
Submitted by rev_run_d