Reformed Theology Donald Trump and Militant Evangelical Masculinity - by Chair of the history department at Calvin College Kristin Du Mez,  Calvinism

Donald Trump and Militant Evangelical Masculinity – by Chair of the history department at Calvin College Kristin Du Mez,

Reformed Theology Donald Trump and Militant Evangelical Masculinity - by Chair of the history department at Calvin College Kristin Du Mez,  Calvinism
Donald Trump and Militant Evangelical Masculinity – by Chair of the history department at Calvin College Kristin Du Mez,
http://religionandpolitics.org/2017/01/17/donald-trump-and-militant-evangelical-masculinity/
http://religionandpolitics.org/2017/01/17/donald-trump-and-militant-evangelical-masculinity/
Link: Donald Trump and Militant Evangelical Masculinity – by Chair of the history department at Calvin College Kristin Du Mez,
Submitted by tanhan27

Reformed Theology The Immigrant Apostles’ Creed - by Presbyterian World Missions director José Luis Casal  Calvinism

The Immigrant Apostles’ Creed – by Presbyterian World Missions director José Luis Casal

Reformed Theology The Immigrant Apostles’ Creed - by Presbyterian World Missions director José Luis Casal  Calvinism
The Immigrant Apostles’ Creed – by Presbyterian World Missions director José Luis Casal

The Immigrant Apostles’ Creed

Written by Rev. Jose Luis Casal

 

I believe in Almighty God,

who guided the people in exile and in exodus,

the God of Joseph in Egypt and Daniel in Babylon,

the God of foreigners and immigrants.

 

I believe in Jesus Christ, a displaced Galilean,

who was born away from his people and his home, who fled

his country with his parents when his life was in danger.

When he returned to his own country

he suffered under the oppression of Pontius Pilate,

the servant of a foreign power.

Jesus was persecuted, beaten, tortured, and unjustly condemned to death.

But on the third day Jesus rose from the dead,

not as a scorned foreigner but to offer us citizenship in God’s kingdom.

 

I believe in the Holy Spirit,

the eternal immigrant from God’s kingdom among us,

who speaks all languages, lives in all countries,

and reunites all races.

I believe that the Church is the secure home

for foreigners and for all believers.

I believe that the communion of saints begins

when we embrace all God’s people in all their diversity.

 

I believe in forgiveness, which makes us all equal before God,

and in reconciliation, which heals our brokenness.

I believe that in the Resurrection

God will unite us as one people

in which all are distinct and all are alike at the same time.

I believe in life eternal, in which no one will be foreigner

but all will be citizens of the kingdom

where God reigns forever and ever. Amen.

The Immigrant Apostles’ CreedWritten by Rev. Jose Luis Casal I believe in Almighty God,who guided the people in exile and in exodus,the God of Joseph in Egypt and Daniel in Babylon,the God of foreigners and immigrants. I believe in Jesus Christ, a displaced Galilean,who was born away from his people and his home, who fledhis country with his parents when his life was in danger.When he returned to his own countryhe suffered under the oppression of Pontius Pilate,the servant of a foreign power.Jesus was persecuted, beaten, tortured, and unjustly condemned to death.But on the third day Jesus rose from the dead,not as a scorned foreigner but to offer us citizenship in God’s kingdom. I believe in the Holy Spirit,the eternal immigrant from God’s kingdom among us,who speaks all languages, lives in all countries,and reunites all races.I believe that the Church is the secure homefor foreigners and for all believers.I believe that the communion of saints beginswhen we embrace all God’s people in all their diversity. I believe in forgiveness, which makes us all equal before God,and in reconciliation, which heals our brokenness.I believe that in the ResurrectionGod will unite us as one peoplein which all are distinct and all are alike at the same time.I believe in life eternal, in which no one will be foreignerbut all will be citizens of the kingdomwhere God reigns forever and ever. Amen.
Link: The Immigrant Apostles’ Creed – by Presbyterian World Missions director José Luis Casal
Submitted by tanhan27

Reformed Theology The Third Commandment. What does it mean to take the Lord's name in vain?  Calvinism

The Third Commandment. What does it mean to take the Lord’s name in vain?

Reformed Theology The Third Commandment. What does it mean to take the Lord's name in vain?  Calvinism
The Third Commandment. What does it mean to take the Lord’s name in vain?

Is it about saying things like "OMG" or is it referring to something else?

In his Institutes of the Christian Religion, John Calvin sets the stage for discussing this commandment by noting that an oath is calling God to witness that what we say is true, and that an appropriate oath is a kind of worship of God in that it implies a profession of faith. When human testimony fails, people appeal to God as witness, as the only one able to bring hidden things to light and know what is in the heart. False swearing robs God of his truth (to the observer), and therefore it is a serious matter. With regard to the casual use of God's name, Calvin summarized, "remember that an oath is not appointed or allowed for passion or pleasure, but for necessity." He wrote that the frequency of casual use of the name of God has dulled the public conscience but that the commandment, with its penalty, still stands

Is it about saying things like “OMG” or is it referring to something else?In his Institutes of the Christian Religion, John Calvin sets the stage for discussing this commandment by noting that an oath is calling God to witness that what we say is true, and that an appropriate oath is a kind of worship of God in that it implies a profession of faith. When human testimony fails, people appeal to God as witness, as the only one able to bring hidden things to light and know what is in the heart. False swearing robs God of his truth (to the observer), and therefore it is a serious matter. With regard to the casual use of God’s name, Calvin summarized, “remember that an oath is not appointed or allowed for passion or pleasure, but for necessity.” He wrote that the frequency of casual use of the name of God has dulled the public conscience but that the commandment, with its penalty, still stands
Link: The Third Commandment. What does it mean to take the Lord’s name in vain?
Submitted by tanhan27

Reformed Theology Our accents lie more on the sovereignty of God, on the authority of Scripture, on the need for disciplined holiness in personal Christian life, and finally, on Christianity as a religion of the Kingdom. -Cornelius Plantinga  Calvinism

Our accents lie more on the sovereignty of God, on the authority of Scripture, on the need for disciplined holiness in personal Christian life, and finally, on Christianity as a religion of the Kingdom. -Cornelius Plantinga

Reformed Theology Our accents lie more on the sovereignty of God, on the authority of Scripture, on the need for disciplined holiness in personal Christian life, and finally, on Christianity as a religion of the Kingdom. -Cornelius Plantinga  Calvinism
Our accents lie more on the sovereignty of God, on the authority of Scripture, on the need for disciplined holiness in personal Christian life, and finally, on Christianity as a religion of the Kingdom. -Cornelius Plantinga

This quote is explaining how Reformed Christians have a different emphasis to other Christians. I'll take the quote apart and try to explain in my own words what I think he means. I am by no means an authority, this is just my own uneducated understanding.

Our accents lie more on the sovereignty of God,

We emphasize God's Lordship over all creation. This is why reformed Christians are into having Christian institutions. Growing up I went to Christian school that integrated a Christian perspective into every class, my parents kept their money at the Christian credit union, many people we knew were involved in CLAC a Christian labour union. There were many involved in social justice work such as feeding the hungry and sponsoring refugees to resettle in Canada, and organizations concerned with Climate change and protecting the environment. All of these institutions I described were founded and run by members of the reformed community I was a part of.

on the authority of Scripture,

Many other Christian traditions do this also, but contrast this perhaps with Roman Catholic or Eastern Orthodox traditions which treat church tradition as having equal authority as scripture. Also contrasting to some of the more liberal mainline churches which might have some who go the direction of scholars such as those who participated in The Jesus Seminar which pick apart the bible and questions the authority of most of it, if not all of it.

on the need for disciplined holiness in personal Christian life,

It's not only about what we believe, but also about how we live. I've observed fellow reformed Christians living differently in such ways as resting on the Sabbath, being extra generous with their time and resources, living a simple and thrifty life, being good stewards and not being wasteful, choosing careers focused on kingdom living, choosing jobs in which they can love their neighbor or do some other kingdom work and I don't mean everyone has to work in the ministry, reformed people also start businesses and farms or pick other ordinary careers and professions but with the intention of living a life for Jesus or fulfilling a calling. Many examples of reformed people doing this with their lives are coming to mind.

and finally, on Christianity as a religion of the Kingdom.

This goes along with the sovereignty of God thing. Jesus is king here and now and so we live like this is true in every aspect of our lives. And we recognize that the kingdom if bigger than just reformed Christians and we have a unity with Christians of other traditions because we are all a part of the same Kingdom and doing the same Kingdom work.

This quote is explaining how Reformed Christians have a different emphasis to other Christians. I’ll take the quote apart and try to explain in my own words what I think he means. I am by no means an authority, this is just my own uneducated understanding.Our accents lie more on the sovereignty of God,We emphasize God’s Lordship over all creation. This is why reformed Christians are into having Christian institutions. Growing up I went to Christian school that integrated a Christian perspective into every class, my parents kept their money at the Christian credit union, many people we knew were involved in CLAC a Christian labour union. There were many involved in social justice work such as feeding the hungry and sponsoring refugees to resettle in Canada, and organizations concerned with Climate change and protecting the environment. All of these institutions I described were founded and run by members of the reformed community I was a part of.on the authority of Scripture,Many other Christian traditions do this also, but contrast this perhaps with Roman Catholic or Eastern Orthodox traditions which treat church tradition as having equal authority as scripture. Also contrasting to some of the more liberal mainline churches which might have some who go the direction of scholars such as those who participated in The Jesus Seminar which pick apart the bible and questions the authority of most of it, if not all of it.on the need for disciplined holiness in personal Christian life,It’s not only about what we believe, but also about how we live. I’ve observed fellow reformed Christians living differently in such ways as resting on the Sabbath, being extra generous with their time and resources, living a simple and thrifty life, being good stewards and not being wasteful, choosing careers focused on kingdom living, choosing jobs in which they can love their neighbor or do some other kingdom work and I don’t mean everyone has to work in the ministry, reformed people also start businesses and farms or pick other ordinary careers and professions but with the intention of living a life for Jesus or fulfilling a calling. Many examples of reformed people doing this with their lives are coming to mind.and finally, on Christianity as a religion of the Kingdom.This goes along with the sovereignty of God thing. Jesus is king here and now and so we live like this is true in every aspect of our lives. And we recognize that the kingdom if bigger than just reformed Christians and we have a unity with Christians of other traditions because we are all a part of the same Kingdom and doing the same Kingdom work.
Link: Our accents lie more on the sovereignty of God, on the authority of Scripture, on the need for disciplined holiness in personal Christian life, and finally, on Christianity as a religion of the Kingdom. -Cornelius Plantinga
Submitted by tanhan27

Reformed Theology Truly Reformed Recipe Swap Friday! 🥞🥘🍲🥗🍜🍝🌮  Calvinism

Truly Reformed Recipe Swap Friday! 🥞🥘🍲🥗🍜🍝🌮

Reformed Theology Truly Reformed Recipe Swap Friday! 🥞🥘🍲🥗🍜🍝🌮  Calvinism
Truly Reformed Recipe Swap Friday! 🥞🥘🍲🥗🍜🍝🌮

Is this sub is too small and too inactive for a Friday chit chat thread? Lol I probably will be the only one to post on this thread but I wanted to share my Chili recipe since it's getting cold out and perfect weather for cooking chili.

Post a recipe if you have one.

Is this sub is too small and too inactive for a Friday chit chat thread? Lol I probably will be the only one to post on this thread but I wanted to share my Chili recipe since it’s getting cold out and perfect weather for cooking chili.Post a recipe if you have one.
Link: Truly Reformed Recipe Swap Friday! 🥞🥘🍲🥗🍜🍝🌮
Submitted by tanhan27

Reformed Theology I never took part in the ESS debate and so I don't know much about it, but this post explained it to me pretty well: "Eternal Submission in the Trinity? A Quick Guide to the Debate"  Calvinism

I never took part in the ESS debate and so I don’t know much about it, but this post explained it to me pretty well: “Eternal Submission in the Trinity? A Quick Guide to the Debate”

Reformed Theology I never took part in the ESS debate and so I don't know much about it, but this post explained it to me pretty well: "Eternal Submission in the Trinity? A Quick Guide to the Debate"  Calvinism
I never took part in the ESS debate and so I don’t know much about it, but this post explained it to me pretty well: “Eternal Submission in the Trinity? A Quick Guide to the Debate”
http://thinktheology.co.uk/blog/article/submission_in_the_trinity_a_quick_guide_to_the_debate
http://thinktheology.co.uk/blog/article/submission_in_the_trinity_a_quick_guide_to_the_debate
Link: I never took part in the ESS debate and so I don’t know much about it, but this post explained it to me pretty well: “Eternal Submission in the Trinity? A Quick Guide to the Debate”
Submitted by tanhan27

Reformed Theology PDF of Abraham Kuyper book - "Christianity and Class Struggle"  Calvinism

PDF of Abraham Kuyper book – “Christianity and Class Struggle”

Reformed Theology PDF of Abraham Kuyper book - "Christianity and Class Struggle"  Calvinism
PDF of Abraham Kuyper book – “Christianity and Class Struggle”
http://www.reformationalpublishingproject.com/pdf_books/Scanned_Books_PDF/ChristianityandtheClassStruggle.pdf
http://www.reformationalpublishingproject.com/pdf_books/Scanned_Books_PDF/ChristianityandtheClassStruggle.pdf
Link: PDF of Abraham Kuyper book – “Christianity and Class Struggle”
Submitted by tanhan27

Reformed Theology FREE Abraham Kuiper book - "Christianity and Class Struggle"  Calvinism

FREE Abraham Kuiper book – “Christianity and Class Struggle”

Reformed Theology FREE Abraham Kuiper book - "Christianity and Class Struggle"  Calvinism
FREE Abraham Kuiper book – “Christianity and Class Struggle”
http://www.reformationalpublishingproject.com/pdf_books/Scanned_Books_PDF/ChristianityandtheClassStruggle.pdf
http://www.reformationalpublishingproject.com/pdf_books/Scanned_Books_PDF/ChristianityandtheClassStruggle.pdf
Link: FREE Abraham Kuiper book – “Christianity and Class Struggle”
Submitted by tanhan27